JAN/FEB 2004

FEATURES – NEUROSCIENCE

Our Tactile Brain
Mark Rowe describes how we are wired to transmit and process an extraordinary array of sensory inputs with remarkable sensitivity and accuracy.

Extrovert or Introvert?
Yvonne Tran, Ashley Craig and Paul McIsaac examine brain activity to determine differences in personality.

Splitting Perceptions
John Bradshaw looks to conjoined twins for evidence that identical perceptions can be shared.

Sulfate’s Role in Autism
Daniel Markovich explains the possible role of the mineral sulfate in human disorders such as autism, growth retardation and reduced fertility.

Sweet Key to Learning
Ruani Fernando describes how an enzyme involved in glucose regulation may be central to understanding the molecular mechanism behind learning and memory.

Does Your Brain Rule Your Heart?
Clive May explains how the brain responds to heart failure.

Treating Brain Disease and Injury with Adult Neural Stem Cells
Natalie Bull says that the real possibility finally exists of using the brain to heal itself using adult neural stem cells.

When and Where Does Schizophrenia Affect the Brain?
Christos Pantelis reveals that abnormal brain changes occur around the time of the first emergence of symptoms in patients developing schizophrenia.

Banking on a Cure for Motor Neuron Disease
A tissue bank storing brain, spinal cord, blood and cerebrospinal fluid has joined mice and zebrafish as important tools in Surindar Cheema’s quest for a treatment for motor neuron disease.

Clues to Alcohol-Seeking Behaviour

Andrew Lawrence describes which parts of the brain may be important in the development and treatment of alcoholism.

Brainstorming New Epilepsy Treatments

Steven Petrou says the creation of mice with the same epilepsy mutation as humans may lead to better drugs with fewer side-effects.

 

SPECIAL REPORT

Patagonian Pirates Stall “Coalition of the Willing”
Simon Grose reports that international efforts to ensure the sustainability of Patagonian toothfish are being stymied by government and corporate interests.

conScience

Beware of Techno-hype!
There’s too much haste and spin and too little mature reflection on the consequences and desirability of what scientists study, says Geoff Davies.

 

BROWSE

Did Adam Meet Eve?

New Species Already Endangered

Origins of Life Questioned

Atmospheric CH4 Levels Stabilise

Quantum Leap for Computing

Virtual Exercise: No Pain, Some Gain?

Drug Offers Hope for Arthritis

Iceman Close to Home

New Jellyfish Found in East Timor

Vaccine Hope for West Nile Virus

Soil Practices Capture Carbon

Hyshot Funding Boost

Setback for Wallaby Genome Sequencing

Temora Crystals Set the Clock for Rock Daters

Prizewinner Urges Support for Basic Research

Antarctic Eclipse

Warming to Devastate Wet Tropics

In-flight DVT Massage

Placid Cows Taste Better

Poo DNA Tracks Endangered Species

Menstrual Injury Link

Limestone Warning for Perth Suburbs

Cool Scientists Awarded

Hair Analysis Clues to Toxin

 

PLUS...

Editorial

Pockley's Razor

Naked Skeptic

Cool Scientist

Weird Science

 


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